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An illustrated introduction to the RBTI testing
Sunday, May 11 2003 - Filed under: General

Here's an overview of the different RBTI test, just to give a feeling of what is done..

Below is a photo of the used instruments:

From left to right: Refractometer with lid closed and eye-piece on the rear-side, the ExTech ExStik pH meter, the Hanna Dist4 milli-Siemens conductivity meassurement device

Test 1: Urine carbohydrates, Brix
Requirement: Brix Refractometer, distilled water, two drops of urine
First the refractometer must be callibrated. The reading with two drops of distilled water should be 0.0 Brix.
After that, the distilled water is removed with a soft cloth.
Two drops of fresh urine are placed on the refractometer window, and the lid is dropped. Then the value is read by looking through the eye-piece.

Test 2: Saliva pH
Requirement: A digital pH meter, a small bit of saliva (fresh)
Dip the pH meter in the saliva until a stable reading appears.

Test 3: Urine pH
Requirement: A digital pH meter, a bottle of urine.
Dip the pH meter in the urine until a stable reading appears.

Test 4: Urine Conductivity (salt level
Requirement: A digital conductivity meter in micro- or mili-Siemens, a bottle of urine.
Put the conductivity meter in the urine and wait for the reading to stabilize. Then divide the mili-Siemens reading by 0.7 or the micro-Siemens reading by 700 to get the salt reading in C units.

Test 5: Cell Debris
Requirement: A bottle of urine
This is a test which is not used in the mathematical expressions as it isn't objective. Just look through the urine and see if you can find particles. The amount of debris determines the reading. Note that the transparency can completely disappear in the urine when the cell debris level is very high. The urine then looks like orange juice..

Preperation for test 6: Preparing the urine mixture
The next two tests are more difficult. Also potentially dangerous because of the use of high-concentration sulfuric acid.
Requirement: Extraction fluid, 1 drop of urine
Take 1 drop of urine and 6 drops of extraction fluid and mix thoroughly.


From left to right: A bottle with the extraction fluid, the nitrate test solution and the ammonia test solution

Test 6: Nitrate Nitrogen
Requirement: urine mixture, nitrate nitrogen reagentia (sulfuric acid)
Take 1 drop of the urine mixture above, and add 4 drops of sulfuric acid (special technique, the 4 drops must come from 4 different sides). Then wait 5 minutes for the color to develop. The shade of blue and the shapes are then compared to a reference chart, which results in the nitrate nitrogen figure.

The colour development after 2 minutes


And after 5 minutes:

This corresponds with a nitrate ammonia reading of 7

Test 7: Ammonia Nitrogen
Requirement: urine mixture, ammonia nitrogen reagentia
Take 1 drop of the urine mixture above, and add 4 drops of the ammonia nitrogen reagentia (special technique, the 4 drops must come from 4 different sides). Then wait 15-45 seconds for the color to develop. The shade of yellow/brown/orange and the shapes are then compared to a reference chart, which results in the ammonia nitrogen figure.


Example: The yellow, as it appeared after about 30 seconds, as shown in this picture, corresponds with number 6 on the reference chart. The ammonia nitrogen number is thus 6.

That's it.. I hope you get the idea of how the RBTI testing is done.. In the beginning, the testing is a bit difficult and it takes some time.. But after some tests, you get the hang of it and it goes faster and faster.
The cleaning in the end takes the most time..

I bought these instruments (except the ExStik) from www.phasesoftware.com . It's the basic kit at www.phasesoftware.com/kits.php . I really appreciate their high service level..

I bought the Exstik from www.same-day.com/miva/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=S&Product_Code=pH100&Category_Code=MM but there are several other companies where these can be bought..





Please note: The information on this website is not a recommendation for treatment. Anyone reading it should consult his/her physician before considering treatment. The author and publisher can't be held responsible for anything. Use on your own risk.
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